2018-09-17 / News

City wells test ‘safe as possible’

By Ste ven Kovac
810-452-2684 • skovac@mihomepaper.com


A Google Earth view of the location of a proposed second communications tower to be erected just south of the existing cell tower on city property at the east end of Maple Street. (See square near center of photo) A Google Earth view of the location of a proposed second communications tower to be erected just south of the existing cell tower on city property at the east end of Maple Street. (See square near center of photo) BROWN CITY — On Aug. 16 the city’s water sources were tested to determine the relative potential for contamination and the results were good.

Reporting to the city council on Sept. 10, City Manager Clint Holmes shared the findings, stating, “The Michigan Dept. of Environmental Quality assigned city wells Number 3 and Number 4 a Source Water Assessment Score based on geologic attributes, taking into consideration the likelihood of things like earthquakes, water well attributes such as is it drilled into rock or soil, water chemistry, and an evaluation of contaminant sources.

“Both wells achieved a rating of ‘Very Low.’ That is the best score and indicates the city’s water source is as safe as possible.”


A view of the wooden framework of a future medical marijuana grow facility being constructed at 4105 Main Street. Such outdoor grow structures were legalized for card holders and caregivers under the voter-initiated Michigan Medical Marihuana Act of 2008. Photo by Steven Kovac A view of the wooden framework of a future medical marijuana grow facility being constructed at 4105 Main Street. Such outdoor grow structures were legalized for card holders and caregivers under the voter-initiated Michigan Medical Marihuana Act of 2008. Photo by Steven Kovac Holmes commended the DPW, saying, “The Brown City DPW has done an exceptional job protecting the city’s water supply.”

In other business:

• Council awarded the city’s garbage contract to Knox Disposal of Brown City, the sole bidder. Knox bid the same price as the current contract, $9.50 per month per house. The new three-year agreement commences Oct. 1.

Holmes made it clear that residents above 65 years of age will still pay $8 per month, and that those under 65 will continue to pay $10 per month.

• Holmes reported that a formal proposal is expected from Haley Wireless Group LLC, of Howell, to construct a second communications tower on city-owned land immediately south of the existing tower at the east end of Maple Street. A tentative agreement calls for the company to pay the city $1,250 in monthly rent, with periodic increases tied to the Consumer Price Index.

Holmes told council that two individuals signed waivers and were issued gate keys to hunt geese at the city’s sewage lagoons on Maple Valley Road.

The problem is excrement from too many geese is polluting the sewage lagoons.

Council believes that controlled hunting will reduce the number of geese congregated on the lagoon property.

“No additional access (for hunting) will be granted,” explained Holmes. “However, a list of individuals desiring access to the lagoons for goose hunting has been started.”

Holmes suggested council consider a lottery system to choose the hunters next year.

• City officials have been informed that a small medical marijuana grow structure is under construction in the backyard of a home at 4105 Main Street.

According to city attorney Greg Stremers, the structure is legal under the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act of 2008, which allows qualified patients and caregivers to build an enclosed, locked, grow facility.

The statute reads in part, “Marihuana plants grown outdoors are considered to be in an enclosed, locked facility if they are not visible to the unaided eye from an adjacent property when viewed by an individual at ground level…and are grown within a stationary structure that is enclosed on all sides, except for the base, by chain-link fencing, wooden slats, or a similar material…”

The state has compiled a list of rules for the construction of such facilities and they are subject to inspection by law enforcement officials to ensure compliance.

A representative of the Brown City Council will contact the owner and erector of the structure to make sure he is aware of all the regulations.

• In her report to council, Mayor Julie Miller referenced a letter she had received from a city resident that wanted to see the speed limit lowered from 35 miles per hour on Main Street through downtown for safety reasons.

Miller said she wants all citizens to understand that the speed limit on M-90 (Main Street) is set by the state not the city.

• Miller also announced the results of City Manager Clint Holmes’ semi-annual evaluation. Holmes received a rating of 895 out of a possible 1,155, or 77 percent.

• Council member Patricia Jacobson pointed out that the backfill of a trench dug recently at St. Marys and Second Street has settled and needs to be filled in. She also expressed concern that a potentially dangerous tree on the corner of John Street at Main Street still hasn’t been removed.

• Council member Christine Lee, who also serves on the Fire Authority, reminded citizens that the fire department’s Safety Open House will be held at the firehall on Oct. 13 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Lee then recognized “the many things the firemen have been doing on their own with no pay to make the fire station look nice.”

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